Rich Texts for Character- Grit, Tenacity, Perseverance, and Resilience

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In my previous post I shared a few tips to help focus classroom conversations around the 6Cs in general, and the C of character specifically. As a continuation to the conversation around character, here is a curated list of rich texts around the themes of grit, tenacity, perseverance, and resilience.

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Videos

Podcast

Screen Shot 2020-02-17 at 2.32.09 PMhttps://www.npr.org/player/embed/472162167/472993559

Picture Books

** All book reviews from Amazon.com

Lou has never climbed a tree before, and she’s sure she can’t do it. So she tries to convince her friends to play a not-up-a-tree game. When that doesn’t work, she comes up with reasons for not joining them — her arm is sore, her cat needs a walk, you shouldn’t climb so soon after eating. Finally, she tells herself she doesn’t want to climb the tree. But is that true, or is this brave adventurer just too afraid to try?

Celebrating the stories of Indigenous people throughout time, Wab Kinew has created a powerful rap song, the lyrics of which are the basis for the text in this beautiful picture book, illustrated by the acclaimed Joe Morse. Including figures such as Crazy Horse, Net-no-kwa, former NASA astronaut John Herrington and Canadian NHL goalie Carey Price, Go Show the World showcases a diverse group of Indigenous people in the US and Canada, both the more well known and the not- so-widely recognized. Individually, their stories, though briefly touched on, are inspiring; collectively, they empower the reader with this message: “We are people who matter, yes, it’s true; now let’s show the world what people who matter can do.”

This is the story of a persistent problem and the child who isn’t so sure what to make of it. The longer the problem is avoided, the bigger it seems to get. But when the child finally musters up the courage to face it, the problem turns out to be something quite different than it appeared.

Lucy is having a terrible day. She’s falling down a mountain. As she passes various characters―a mountain man, a bungeeing duck, and a pile of shuffling bears―she tries to ask for help. But everyone misinterprets her requests.

Everyone knows that when Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall. But what happened after?

As one artist incorporates accidental splotches, spots, and misshapen things into her art, she transforms her piece in quirky and unexpected ways, taking readers on a journey through her process.

Provocations

 

 

 

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